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Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

  • America is a country of young men.
- Old Age
  • Art is a jealous mistress.
- Wealth
  • A beautiful woman is a practical poet.
- Beauty
  • Books are for nothing but to inspire.
- The American Scholar
  • Every calamity is a spur and valuable hint.
- Fate
  • Every suppressed or expunged word reverberates through the earth from side to side.
- Compensation
  • A great man is always willing to be little.
- Compensation
  • Character is always known. Thefts never enrich; alms never impoverish; murder will speak out of stone walls.
- Commencement address, Harvard Divinity School, 1838
  • I like the silent church before the service begins, better than any preaching.
- Self - Reliance
  • A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
- Self - Reliance
  • To be great is to be misunderstood.
- Self - Reliance
  • We think our civilization near its meridian, but we are yet only at the cock-crowing and the morning star.
- Politics
  • The less government we have, the better.
- Politics
  • A sufficient measure of civilization is the influence of good women.
- Civilization
  • Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.
- Circles
  • A little fact is worth a whole limbo of dreams.
- The Superlative
  • The sense of being well-dressed gives a feeling of inward tranquillity which religion is powerless to bestow.
- Social Aims
  • A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.
- Friendship
  • A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud.
- Friendship
  • God builds his temple in the heart on the ruins of churches and religions.
- Worship
  • The essence of greatness is the perception that virtue is enough.
- Heroism
  • Nothing is more vulgar than haste.
- The Conduct of Life
  • The louder he talked of his honour, the faster we counted our spoons.
- Worship in The Conduct of Life
  • Every hero becomes a bore at last.
- Representative Men
  • Hospitality consists in a little fire, a little food, and an immense quiet.
- Journal, 1856
  • Law rules throughout existence, a Law which is not intelligent, but intelligence.
- Fate
  • When you strike at a king, you must kill him.
- attributed
  • Language is the archive of history.
- The Poet
  • Life consists in what a man is thinking of all day.
- Journals, 1847
  • Good men must not obey the laws too well.
- Politics
  • We are always getting ready to live but never living.
- Journals, 1834
  • All mankind love a lover.
- Love
  • A man is a god in ruins.
- Nature
  • Character is always known. Thefts never enrich; alms never impoverish; murder will speak out of stone walls.
- Commencement Address, Harvard Divinity School, 1838
  • A party is perpetually corrupted by personality.
- Politics
  • Poverty demoralizes.
- Wealth
  • Power is the first good.
- Inspiration
  • You shall have joy, or you shall have power, said God: you shall not have both.
- Journals, 1842
  • Life is a search after power.
- Power
  • Prayer is the contemplation of the facts of life from the highest point of view.
- Self-reliance
  • Pride ruined the angels.
- The Sphinx
  • The saint and poet seek privacy.
- Culture
  • Proverbs are the sanctuary of the intuitions.
- Compensation
  • I hate quotations, tell me what you know.
- Journal, Dec 20, 1822
  • Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of it.
- Quotation and Originality
  • The test of a religion or philosophy is the number of things it can explain.
- Journals, 1836
  • In every society some men are born to rule, and some to advise.
- The Young American
  • After thirty, a man wakes up sad every morning, excepting perhaps five or six, until the day of his death.
- Journals, 1834
  • People see only what they are prepared to see.
- Journals, 1863
  • Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world.
- Hymn Sung at the Completion of the Battle Monument, Concord
  • Things have their laws as well as men; things refuse to be trifled with.
- Politics
  • The believing we do something when we do nothing is the first illusion of tobacco.
- Journals, 1859
  • No man should travel until he has learned the language of the country he visits. Otherwise he voluntarily makes himself a great baby, - so helpless and ridiculous.
- Journals
  • Travelling is a fool's paradise.
- Self-reliance
  • God offers to every mind its choice between truth and repose.
- Intellect
  • There is a capacity of virtue in us, and there is a capacity of vice to make your blood creep.
- Journals.
  • Hitch your wagon to a star.
- Civilization
  • War educates the senses, calls into action the will, perfects the physical constitution, brings men into such swift and close collision in critical moments that man measures man.
- War
  • Wise men are not wise at all times.
- Wealth
  • Wit makes its own welcome and levels all distinctions.
- The Comic
  • A woman should always challenge our respect, and never move our compassion.
- Journals, 1836
  • Men love to wonder, and that is the seed of science.
- Society and Solitude
  • All writing comes by the grace of God.
- Experience

Osceola


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Page last modified on Sunday December 16, 2007 13:04:47 GMT-0000 by gyanpathak.